<![CDATA[The Spiraling Chains: Kowalski - Bellan Family Trees - The Spiraling Chains]]>Fri, 29 Jan 2016 22:05:09 -0500Weebly<![CDATA[Old Photos: Research, Return & Repeat]]>Wed, 19 Aug 2015 22:26:00 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/the-spiraling-chains/old-photos-research-return-repeatOld Photos: Research, Return, and Repeat
This past week, I was re-scanning some of my grandmother's old photos from her service in the U.S. Coast Guard SPARS during WWII. (I wrote a short blog post about it here.) In many of these photos, my grandmother is pictured with fellow SPAR women, and a few military men as well. The great thing about her photo album is that, for nearly every photo, she wrote down each person's name and where they were from. 

So, as I was scanning, I came across several photos of an Army man by the name of Bart Noland from Iowa. I was curious. I Googled 'Bart Noland Iowa army,' but didn't really come up with anything. I went to Ancestry and searched for him. In a public tree on Ancestry, I found a Bartley W. Noland from Iowa who was born in 1918, so I decided to message the owner and hope for the best. 

The next day, the owner of that tree wrote me back and told me a little bit about their family's Bart Noland. (The tree owner turned out to be a cousin of Bart's wife.) He sent me his email address, I sent him scans of the photos, and he sent those scans to one of Bart's living children, who confirmed that this was indeed her father, who had passed away in 2001. (Lesson: Keep a family tree PUBLIC on Ancestry, even if it is just the basics. I would not have found Bart's family if this gentleman's tree had been private.)

Even though she now has all of the photos in digital form, I will be sending Bart's daughter the physical photos of her father, as well as a photo of his barracks he stayed in while in Florida, and some scenic snapshots he sent my grandmother during his time in Hawaii. They belong to her and her family. I can always have the photos of him reprinted if I want to fill in the empty holes in my grandmother's scrapbook.

Are you in possession of any old photos of non-family members? If you have names attached to those photos, I urge you to use your research skills to try to find living descendants of those pictured, and, if possible, return those photos (or at least email the scans) to living family members. Bart's daughter was SO grateful to me for reaching out and finding their family - She found out about these photos on her 35th wedding anniversary and said she felt like this was her Dad "remembering" this special day for her.

My mission now is to try to find some of these women pictured in the photos. Most of them married after the war and, of course, changed their names, so it may be much harder to find any of their children or grandchildren with whom to share these photos. But I will still try.  :-)

©2015, Emily Kowalski Schroeder

]]>
<![CDATA[Minster Obituary File and Funeral Card File]]>Sat, 11 Jul 2015 18:53:26 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/the-spiraling-chains/minster-obituary-file-and-funeral-card-fileI haven't posted on this blog recently, but that doesn't mean I've haven't been busy in other genealogy-related ways. If you read my blog frequently, you know that my husband's family, past and present, hail from western Ohio. Last month, I took a trip to the village of Minster, Ohio, which is located in the southwestern part of Auglaize County. I visited the Minster Historical Society and Museum, and wanted to share a couple of the resources available to researchers who have ancestors from this portion of western Ohio.

Minster Obituary File: The historical society has collected, translated, and organized obituaries for area residents, and, in some cases, non-residents who have family ties to the area. The important information has been extracted from newspaper obituaries, places on index cards, and organized alphabetically in a card catalog. It was easy to find the names on my list, and then I simply used my phone to snap a photo of the cards. Each card referenced the original source of the obituary, which is usually (but not always) the town newspaper, The Minster Post. Anyone can access past issues of The Minster Post at this site for FREE, so you would easily able to track down the original, as-published, obit. Truth be told, I had already tracked down most the obituaries I needed just by using the newspaper database from home, but there were a couple of names for whom I had no idea when they passed away, so searching through issue after issue of the newspaper was not practical. Found them in this file, and - voila - obituary found! Here is an example of one of the obituary file cards:
Minster Obituary File Card
Obituary from Minster Obituary File
Minster Funeral Card Collection: The Minster Historical Society and Museum boasts a collection of over 20,000 funeral cards, and they are adding more all the time. This collection was again housed in simple card catalog draws and arranged alphabetically and with the deceased's birthday at the top. The important information from the cards was photocopied and then pasted right onto the index card itself. Again, I just used my phone and snapped pictures of the cards pertaining to my husband's family. (Of course, they aren't all in German - these are some of my favorites, though!)
Minster Funeral Card File
Minster Funeral Card File
I should mention that ANYONE can send in copies of funeral cards to add to their collection. I recently received my grandmother-in-law's collection of funeral cards and I'm in the process of scanning them right now. From what I saw on my trip, I know that they already have a lot of the cards I have, but they also DIDN'T have some, so I will make sure I send them copies of those.

If your family or clients have any ancestors that may have had ties to western Ohio (even as far north as Toledo or as far south as Cincinnati), I highly recommend you check out these sources. The obituaries can be searched through the Rutherford B. Hayes Obituary Index, but the funeral cards must be searched on-site. (I've been told by a reliable source that they are working on getting the funeral cards online at some point as well.)

©2015, Emily Kowalski Schroeder
]]>
<![CDATA[Military Monday: Women in Military Service for America Memorial]]>Mon, 06 Apr 2015 00:38:03 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/the-spiraling-chains/military-monday-women-in-military-service-for-america-memorialLast week, my family and I spent part of our spring break touring Washington D.C. We visited Arlington National Cemetery, and, more specifically, the Women in Military Service for America Memorial. The structure is more than just a memorial, though; it also serves as a small museum dedicated to all women, past and present, who have served in the American military.
Picture
Women in Military Service for America Memorial, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA
As I've mentioned before on this blog, my maternal grandmother, Dina Licciardi Bellan served in the U.S. Coast Guard SPARS during World War II. Unfortunately, she passed away several months before this memorial was opened, so she never got to see it. We took our kids to the memorial to look around. I stumbled upon their Register room, where patrons are able to look up service women on computer. I typed in my grandmother's name, and there was her record. The record included her dates of birth and death, along with service dates, rank, birthplace, and military decorations she received. There was ALSO a photo of her in her SPARS uniform that I had never seen before. I was standing there trying to take a good photo of the computer screen when one of the volunteers mentioned that they could give me a color printout for $10. And so I have it!:
Picture
Notice that area at the bottom entitled 'Memorable Experiences.' I mentioned to one of the volunteers that my grandmother had written a little about her first experiences in the Coast Guard in a journal she kept towards the end of her life. She gave me instructions about how I can go online and add those memories to my grandmother's record.

Unfortunately, the database of women is not available online, according to their website. However, there is plenty of contact information on this page and this page, so if you have a family member who might be registered in the database, it wouldn't hurt to contact them and find out if they can send a print out to you. I did not have to give any physical proof of my relationship to my grandmother to obtain this printout - I just told them she was my grandmother and that was it. (They might be more strict if the person about which you are inquiring is still alive, however.)

©2015, Emily Kowalski Schroeder
]]>
<![CDATA[Sunday's Obituary: Bernard Otto Grilliot and Cletus Grilliot]]>Sun, 05 Apr 2015 01:45:54 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/the-spiraling-chains/sundays-obituary-bernard-otto-grilliot-and-cletus-grilliotToday, I'm sharing the obituary of Bernard Otto Grilliot, the father of my husband's paternal grandmother, Naomi Grilliot Schroeder. He was born 16 Nov 1898 in Yorkshire, Patterson Twp, Darke County, Ohio to Nicholas Grilliot and Amelia Magoto. He was their third of ten children. He married Frances Drees on 31 May 1921 and they had ten children. His obituary does a nice job of listing his address and naming his parents, all of his children, and his surviving siblings.
Bernard O. Grilliot Obituary
Obituary of Bernard O. Grilliot (The Minster Community Post, 28 Feb 1980, page 2, columns 1-2)
Three days before Bernard passed away, his younger brother, Cletus, died. His obituary is found in the same edition of the newspaper, right next to Bernard's. They were both members of Sacred Heart Church in McCartyville, Ohio and they are both buried in the church cemetery.
Cletus W. Grilliot Obituary
Cletus W. Grilliot Obituary (The Minster Community Post, 28 Feb 1980, page 2, column 3)
For more about the Grilliot Family of western Ohio, see this link.

©2015, Emily Kowalski Schroeder
]]>
<![CDATA[Wedding Wednesday: Beljan-Benički Wedding]]>Wed, 11 Feb 2015 12:04:39 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/the-spiraling-chains/wedding-wednesday-beljan-benicki-wedding Recently, I found a marriage record for which I had been looking for a long time. My great-grandparents, George and Ursula Bellan were Croatian immigrants who immigrated to the U.S. in 1893 and 1898, respectively. My great-grandmother indicated on her 1898 passenger ship manifest that she was going to her 'husband,' but the 1900 U.S. Census indicated that they had only been married 1 1/2 years. 

So which one was correct? Had they been married in Croatia before George left for America, or did they wait until Ursula arrived in America? Well, a couple of years ago, I visited the Cuyahoga County Archives in Cleveland, Ohio, and they were NOT able to find a county marriage record for George and Ursula. The researcher did warn me that there may have been just a church wedding, so it may not have been recorded at the county level.

Recently, I conducted a search for the record on FamilySearch.org, and wouldn't you believe it, there was the record, nice and indexed for me plain as day! It always pays to go back and look at databases you've already searched! Here is the record (click for larger image):
Marriage Record of Juraj Beljan and Ursula Benicki
The wedding took place on 29 May 1892 in Podstene, Primorje-Gorski Kotar, Croatia. Juraj, son of Franjo and Rozalija Beljan, was 19 years old and resided in Sela, Brod Moravice. Ursula, daughter of Mate and Ursula Benički, was 18 years old and from Doluš. The witnesses were Miko Brajdić and Anton Benički. Anton was probably Ursula's uncle. Brajdić was the maiden name of Juraj's mom, so Miko is likely a maternal uncle or cousin of Juraj.

About a year later, Juraj (soon to be George), left for America, not to see his wife for five years. According to his Petition for Naturalization, George arrived in America on 5 Jun 1893.

©2015, Emily Kowalski Schroeder 

Marriage Record Source: FHL microfilm 2099984. Marriage, Podstene, Primorje-Gorski Kotar, Croatia. p 70, Vjencani 1858-1913, Hrvatskog Drzavnog Arhiva, Zagrebu.
]]>
<![CDATA[Funny Friday: Bernardo Licciardi or The Lorax?]]>Fri, 06 Feb 2015 01:34:49 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/the-spiraling-chains/funny-friday-bernardo-licciardi-or-the-lorax Earlier this week, my four year old daughter and I were doing a craft that involved looking at photos of ancestors. We were cutting them out, preparing them to paste onto paper hearts, when we get to this one, a photo of my great-great-grandfather, Bernardo Licciardi:
Picture
So, as with all the other photos, I tell her who it is, but (in her silly voice) she says to me, "That's the Lorax." Many of you probably know that the Lorax is a Dr. Seuss character. We've read the book, we've watched the movie, and my daughter even painted a little paper Lorax at preschool. And now she's decided that her great-great-great-grandfather is a Lorax doppelganger. I gotta say, I can't argue with her.
Picture
]]>
<![CDATA[Happy Birthday, Grandpa Schroeder]]>Mon, 02 Feb 2015 12:34:19 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/the-spiraling-chains/happy-birthday-grandpa-schroeder On this date in 1925, my husband's paternal grandfather, Walter Schroeder was born. He is the only son of Anthony and Leona (Knob) Schroeder and he was born in the very small rural community of St. Patricks in Shelby County, Ohio. Here is his short birth announcement from the 13 Feb 1925 edition of The Minster Post:
Picture
Walter Schroeder Birth Announcement (25 Feb 1925, The Minster Post)
Walter, who acquired the nickname 'Chub' early on in his life, was the third of five children born to Anthony and Leona. He had four sisters, all of whom have passed away. On 26 Aug 1944 in the nearby town of McCartyville, he married Naomi Grilliot, daughter of Bernard O. Grilliot and Frances Drees. They have six children together, an Naomi also celebrated her 90th birthday this past December.

Here are a few of photos from his 90th birthday celebration. His love of cake hasn't diminished with age!
Picture
Walter's birthday cake
Picture
Loves the cake! (Who doesn't?)
Picture
Walter and Naomi with their daughter, Nancy
Walter's parents, Anthony and Leona, were both grandchildren of German immigrants who settled in western Ohio in the mid-19th century. To learn more about Walter's ancestors, click on the links below.

Walter's paternal line: SCHROEDER
Walter's maternal line: KNOB


©2015, Emily Kowalski Schroeder
]]>
<![CDATA[Matrilineal Monday: Louisa Kahlig Braun]]>Mon, 26 Jan 2015 04:00:02 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/the-spiraling-chains/matrilineal-monday-louisa-kahlig-braun Yesterday, I posted the obituary and death certificate of Louisa Kahlig Braun, one of my husband's great-great-grandmothers through his maternal line. Today I thought I would share a record I recently found through FamilySearch.org: Louisa's baptism record. (Click for larger view.)
Louisa Kahlig Braun Baptism Record
Baptism Record of Aloisia Kahlig
The Catholic church book record states that 'Aloisia' was born 25 Feb 1870 to Franz Kahlig and Judith Beier. The record is written in German and the Kahlig family members were native German speakers. They lived in the Moravian-Silesian Region of what is now the Czech Republic. When they immigrated to America in 1871, they listed their country of origin as Austria, because their homeland was part of Austria-Hungary at the time. When she was born, Louisa had two older siblings - a brother Josef, born in 1865, and a sister Ludmilla ('Amelia' in the U.S.), born in 1862. A younger sister, Caroline, was born in the U.S. in 1873. Here is her parents' marriage record from 1861. In this record, her mother, Judith's surname is spelled Beyer. (Click for larger image.)
Kahlig Beyer Marriage Record
Marriage Record of Franz Kahlig and Judith Beyer.
The Kahlig family settled in rural Mercer County, Ohio and ran a farm. Around 1890, Louisa married John M. Braun, son of Peter and Elizabeth (Uhleman) Braun. Between 1892 and 1912, they had ten children. John passed away in 1936 and Louisa in 1948. You can view information regarding their children on my Braun Family page at this link.

More documents and information about the Kahlig Family can be found at this link.

©2015 copyright Emily Kowalski Schroeder

Baptism Record Source: FamilySearch.org, Czech Republic Church Books, 1552-1963, Catholic, Novy Jicin, Jesenik nad Odrou, Baptisms 1858-1896 (vol 2049), Image 84/274.

Marriage Record Source: FamilySearch.org, Czech Republic Church Books, 1552-1963, Catholic, Novy Jicin, Jesenik nad Odrou, Marriages 1836-1871 (vol 2038), Image 61/93.
]]>
<![CDATA[Sunday's Obituary: Louisa Kahlig Braun]]>Sun, 25 Jan 2015 01:36:36 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/the-spiraling-chains/sundays-obituary-louisa-kahlig-braun Louisa Kahlig Braun was one of my husband's great-great-grandmothers on his mom's side of the family. Here is her obituary from The Lima News dated 29 Apr 1948:
Louisa Kahlig Braun Obituary
The copy is a little difficult to read, but it says that she passed away in her home in St. Peter (Mercer County), Ohio. She was 78 years old and was the widow of John M. Braun. The obituary lists six surviving daughters: Mrs. Frank Hamlin of Eugene, Oregon, Mrs. Lawrence Brunswick and Mrs. Urban Abels of Sharpsburg, Ohio, Mrs. Theodore Homan of Philothea, Ohio, Sister M. Levine of St. Joseph's Orphanage in Cincinnati, and Miss Ida Braun, with whom she lived. Her surviving sons were Theodore of Sharpsburg, and Peter and Raymond, with both of whom she lived. (One daughter not mentioned here, Olivia Braun Evers, passed away in 1944.)

Louisa's death certificate (below) states that the cause of death was coronary occlusion and that she suffered from high blood pressure and general hardening of the arteries. 
Louisa Kahlig Braun Death Certificate
Louisa Kahlig Braun Death Certificate
Tomorrow, I will post some more information about Louisa's and her family's background, including her baptism record, which I recently discovered.

Death Certificate Source: FamilySearch.org, Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953, 1948, 25101-28300, Image 743/3555

©2015 Emily Kowalski Schroeder
]]>
<![CDATA[Travel Tuesday: Mexico City to San Antonio, 1955]]>Tue, 13 Jan 2015 04:00:01 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/the-spiraling-chains/travel-tuesday-mexico-city-to-san-antonio-1955A couple of weeks ago, I was going through my many (mostly unhelpful) shaky leaf hints on Ancestry.com, and I came across a couple new ones related to my great-grandparents, Adele and Luigi (Louis) Licciardi. It was an American Airlines passenger list showing arrival in San Antonio, TX from Mexico City in 1955. On the left is the first page with information about the plane and crew, and on the right you will see Adele and Luigi listed. (Click for larger view.)
Now, I try to keep up-to-date with the list of new databases that Ancestry.com is always adding. I'm sure that I saw the addition of this database, but, being that I have zero relations who lived in Texas, I did not think much of it. I'm glad Ancestry flagged this one for me, because I'm sure I wouldn't have found it otherwise.

I had known that my great-grandparents enjoyed traveling abroad in their early retirement years. They went (back) to Europe at least a couple of times and I have seen a photo of them in Mexico. Next time I am back at my parents' house, I will have to look through old photos again and see if any of them are dated January 1955.

©2015, Emily Kowalski Schroeder

Source: Passenger and Crew Manifests of Airplanes Arriving at San Antonio, Texas 1955-1957. NARA Microform publication A3974. 9 rolls. NAI: 2922359. Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787-2004, Record Group 85, The National Archives at Washington, DC
]]>