<![CDATA[The Spiraling Chains: Kowalski - Bellan Family Trees - The Spiraling Chains]]>Wed, 16 Apr 2014 08:58:37 -0500Weebly<![CDATA[Surname Saturday: Bodziony]]>Sat, 12 Apr 2014 01:35:03 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/1/post/2014/04/surname-saturday-bodziony.html Bodziony was the maiden name of my paternal grandmother, Veronica Bodziony Kowalski.  She was a child of two Polish immigrants, Michael Bodziony and Sophia Krupa, who settled in Cleveland, Ohio.  In 1883, Michael Bodziony was born in the village of Świniarsko, a few kilometers away from the larger city of Nowy Sącz (see map below).  At the time of his birth, this area, which has been ethnically-Polish for centuries, was part of the Austria-Hungary Empire.
When you first read the name 'Bodziony,' I don't think you immediately think of it as a Polish or even a Slavic surname.  Even today, it's not a terribly common name in Poland, and the highest concentration of the name is still found in and around Nowy Sącz CountyMałopolska Voivodeship, which is on Poland's southern border with Slovakia.  The map below was generated by the website Moikrewni.pl, which literally means "my kin" in Polish.  It shows the relative distribution of the surname Bodziony throughout modern-day Poland.  According to Worldnames Public Profiler, which compiles surname data from modern telephone directories and voting registers, the surname Bodziony has a frequency in Poland of 42.8 per million.  For comparison, the surname Kowalski, which is a very common surname, has a frequency of 1847 per million. Not surprisingly the frequency per million in America is only 0.47.
Picture
Distribution of the surname 'Bodziony' in Poland (Image Source: Moikewni.pl)
So, what does the surname Bodziony mean?  According to good old Google Translate, the Polish word bodziec is a noun which means 'stimulus' or 'incentive.'  I asked the native Polish-speakers in a Facebook group, and one person told me that the name has the same root as the word bóść, which is a verb meaning 'to gore.'  I think its relative infrequency tells me that it probably doesn't describe a profession, as a lot of surnames all over the world tend to do.  

The surname could possibly be a reference to a place name.  There is a town by the name of Bodzanów about 70 kilometers to the northwest of Świniarsko. (There are actually several villages with this name around Poland, but this one is the closest.) There is a also a town farther away in Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship(north of Małopolska Voivodeship) known as Bodzentyn, which has been around since the 1300s.  So, it's possible that the family name originated as a way to tell other people "this family is from Bodz... village."  

I do have evidence that the name was NOT changed when Michael came to America - the name shows up fairly frequently in the 19th century Roman Catholic Church records of the Diocese of Tarnow.

©2014, copyright Emily Kowalski Schroeder
Print Friendly and PDF
]]>
<![CDATA[National Siblings Day]]>Thu, 10 Apr 2014 19:22:25 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/1/post/2014/04/national-sibling-day.html Today, April 10th, is National Siblings Day. I grew up with four younger siblings, so there was never a dull moment in our house.  I used today as an excuse to scan and post a few photos of me and my siblings.  
Picture
All of us from 2007.  I was pregnant with my son at the time.
Picture
June 1980 with my newborn baby brother. I was 18 months old.
Picture
Me and my brother, March 1981.  Rockin' the hoodies.
Picture
Two of my younger brothers checking out my new Lego set, November 1989.
Picture
Me with my brother, summer 1990. (Omg, yes I am wearing a 'Bartman' t-shirt.)
Picture
My brother and I with our new baby sister, late November 1990.
Picture
Me and my sister, 1995. We are on our grandmother's front lawn.
Picture
Me and my sister, Christmas 1998.  (And yes, I am wearing a WWF Championship Belt :-))
Picture
Me with our dog, Cookie, 1998.  Because I will always consider her one of my 'siblings.'

©2014, copyright Emily Kowalski Schroeder
]]>
<![CDATA[Sunday's Obituary: Henry Tumbusch]]>Sun, 06 Apr 2014 00:45:14 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/1/post/2014/04/sundays-obituary-henry-tumbusch.html Henry Tumbusch was my husband's great-grandfather on his mother's side of the family.  He passed away September 1, 1942.  Here is his obituary, as published in the September 4, 1942 issue of The Minster Post (page 1).
Picture
Picture
Henry was the son of Theodor Tumbusch and Anna Rasing, German immigrants who came to America in 1861.  Unfortunately, Theodor passed away when Henry was only about seven years old. His mother never remarried, but ran the small family farm and raised Henry and his three younger siblings by herself.  She lived until 1918.

As stated in the obituary, Henry married Mary Frances Wimmers in 1893.  (Here in this obituary, she is listed as 'Mary,' which is also her named stated in the Mercer County birth probate record; however, in every census and in her obituaries, she went by 'Frances.')  Henry and Frances had eleven children, nine of whom are listed in the obituary.  One son, Ferdinand, passed away in 1907 at the age of ten months, and another son, Joseph, was born stillborn in 1917.

Henry spent his entire life in Mercer County, Ohio, near the village of St. Henry.  He attended St. Henry Catholic Church and is buried in that cemetery.  According to his death certificate (below), he had suffered from bronchiectasis for a couple of years preceding his death.
Picture
Ohio Death Certificate of Henry Tumbusch, 1942
Death Certificate Source: "Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1953," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X83R-8YJ : accessed 05 Apr 2014), Henry Timbush, 01 Sep 1942; citing Granville Twp., Mercer, Ohio, reference fn 63127; FHL microfilm 2024037.

©2014, copyright Emily Kowalski Schroeder
]]>
<![CDATA[Establishing Genealogical Proof with Thomas W. Jones]]>Mon, 31 Mar 2014 17:56:10 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/1/post/2014/03/establishing-genealogical-proof-with-thomas-w-jones.html This past Saturday, I was at the Western Reserve Historical Society in Cleveland, Ohio to attend an all-day seminar with Thomas W. Jones, renowned genealogist, speaker and educator, and author of the the book, Mastering Genealogical Proof.  The title of the seminar was Establishing Genealogical Proof and the day's full itinerary can be viewed here.

Dr. Jones first talked about the Genealogical Proof Standard.  Most importantly, he spoke about WHY it is needed, and emphasized that establishing proof in genealogy is not the same as certainty or finality.  We are never really "done" researching our family - there may always be 'new' evidence that comes to light that will add to our ancestors' stories.

In the second presentation, Dr. Jones talked about how to compare and contrast (correlate) evidence to attempt to clearly and accurately answer a particular question about an ancestor.  He showed us ways in which to use narratives, lists, timelines, tables, and even maps to carry out this process of correlation.  He spoke about the importance of determining independence of sources before beginning the process of correlation, and that at least two independent sources are necessary before correlation can take place.

After lunch, Dr. Jones talked what we can do as researchers and family history writers when sources do not agree with each other.  He addressed WHY records may disagree and how errors can creep into "official" documents, either intentionally or unintentionally.  He showed us several methods of resolving conflicting evidence and provided examples of how to address conflicting evidence when writing our family histories. 


His final presentation was crowd-interactive.  He gave us a research question and asked us to suggest online sources that could possibly be used to fill in the holes of one particular man's life story. The case study showed the usefulness of researching indirect ancestors in order to answer questions about one direct ancestor. And, this case study showed that we still DO need offline sources of records to truly put together a comprehensive picture of an ancestor's life.

This was not the first time that I've heard Dr. Jones speak; last year, I attended the Ohio Genealogical Society Annual Conference, at which he gave the keynote speech, and, while there, I also attended his shorter talk on documentation.  I enjoyed this day-long seminar more than his shorter presentations at OGS.  It was more in-depth than his shorter presentations, and he did a great job of using real examples and problems that he himself has encountered in his research.  He emphasized that a successful genealogical researcher must have a 'piecing-together-the-puzzle' attitude as opposed to an 'I found it!' attitude, which is a key point that has stuck with me over the past few days.  If you ever get an opportunity to hear him speak, you must jump at it - you will learn so much!


©2014, copyright Emily Kowalski Schroeder
]]>
<![CDATA[Wordless Wednesday: Fun in the Crib, November 1981]]>Wed, 26 Mar 2014 01:14:42 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/1/post/2014/03/wordless-wednesday-fun-in-the-crib-november-1981.html
Picture
Me (age 3), and my little brother, Mike (age 18 months), November, 1981
©2014, Copyright Emily Kowalski Schroeder
]]>
<![CDATA[A Seminar With Cyndi Ingle]]>Sun, 23 Mar 2014 01:37:50 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/1/post/2014/03/a-seminar-with-cyndi-ingle.html Today, at the Indiana Historical Society in Indianapolis, Indiana, I attended an all-day seminar given by Cyndi Ingle.  For those who aren't familiar with Cyndi, she is the creator of Cyndi's List, which is a website containing the MOST comprehensive listing of ALL genealogy-related websites - research sites, database sites, methods and organization sites, history sites, blogs - everything.  She is quite famous within the genealogy community, so I was glad that she came to Indy and that I had the opportunity to hear her speak.  The seminar was entitled, "Genealogy Online: Productive, Organized and Successful."

Each attendee was given a nice booklet containing all of Cyndi's presentation notes, which I really appreciated, because it meant I could relax and pay more attention to exactly what she was saying, instead of worrying about taking notes to try to remember it all.  (I was also able to do some live tweeting, too, which I enjoyed!) 
Picture
Seminar Booklet
Of course, Cyndi took us through her website, explained HOW it was organized and highlighted some of the main categories of links found there.  She gave us some great tips about how to develop a research plan, and she was even kind enough to provide us with links to templates to help us make a research plan of our own.  She talked a lot about using Evernote in genealogy research, which I wasn't necessarily expecting, but I'm glad she did.  I do have an Evernote account; however, I do not use it regularly in my research and my Evernote notes and notebooks are not as organized as I would like them to be.  Cyndi showed us Evernote's full capabilities as far as aiding in genealogy research and organization.  And there's an entire section on her website listing links that are helpful in learning and using Evernote for family history research.

Here are a few main points of her talk that really stuck with me:

- Even when you go through an entire database and find NOTHING helpful in learning about a particular ancestor, it is still a step forward as far as your research process goes.  (So many of us get discouraged when this happens, but now we are free to "check off" that record set and move onto the next potential source of information.)

- Take research notes along every step of the way.  Cyndi referred to it as 'having an ongoing dialogue with yourself.'  This is so important when you have to leave your research alone for a period of time.  We need to know exactly what we were working on and where we left off in the search, especially so we don't backtrack and search the same database or record set AGAIN to no avail.

- Genealogy research is a circular process; there is no end.  She showed us this GREAT graphic from the FamilySearch.org Research Process Wiki, which really helped me better visualize what a successful research process looks like.

- Speaking of visualization, she reminded us to try to visualize our research as much as possible. Using timelines and maps of migration and immigration patterns can all be extremely helpful when we are trying to put all the pieces of the puzzle together.

If you ever get the chance to hear Cyndi speak live, please be sure that you do!  She is an engaging speaker and you can tell that she really loves what she does.  After her seminar today, I am so much more motivated to put more of my research in Evernote, and to be more meticulous in making research plans and keeping better research notes.

©2014, copyright Emily Kowalski Schroeder
]]>
<![CDATA[Those Places Thursday: Google Street View Matches an Old Photograph]]>Thu, 20 Mar 2014 00:26:25 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/1/post/2014/03/those-places-thursday-google-street-view-matches-an-old-photograph.html This past Sunday, I wrote a blog post about how I used 1940 enumeration district maps to figure out just where my grandmother and great-grandparents were living at that time.  From about 1934-1940, they were living at 3591 East Blvd, which has since changed names to Martin Luther King Jr Dr.  Once I sorted out the mystery of the street name change, I plugged the address into Google Street View and found an image of the old home.  Nothing really surprising - it's an old, large home on a fairly long, but narrow, lot.  My great-grandparents were only renting it at the time, and another family is shown living at the same address in the 1940 census, so they only occupied either the upper floor or the main floor. 
I then decided to look through some of the old 1930s photos that my grandmother had saved.  My great-grandparents loved to take photos of their girls standing with each other, not unlike what most parents (including myself) do today with their kids. I have several from this period of the 1930s when they were living in this house, but one in particular caught my eye.  It's blurry and doesn't really do justice to my grandma and her sister, but I was more interested in the setting and background.
Picture
Dina (left) and Yola (right) on porch of 3591 East Blvd, September 1935
Thankfully, my grandma (shown on the left) was pretty good at labeling photos with the proper dates, so I know this one was from September of 1935.  (She didn't label it as such, but if it was a special occasion, it may have been around her 21st birthday.)  But there are bunches of homes in this part of Cleveland with brick porches very similar to what the photograph shows; how do I know that they were standing at the same home shown in Google Street View?

Check out that porch post right over the back of my grandmother's shoulder. It has a nice, unique little diamond decorative touch to it.  I tried to zoom in as far as I could on the home in Google Street View; the resolution isn't great, but it was enough to convince me.
That's it!  That's the pillar in the picture.  Usually seeing these older homes in disrepair makes me sad, but in this case, I am glad nobody has painted over that pillar.  My grandma and her sister took that photo on that porch almost 80 years ago, and before now, I didn't know where it had been taken.  I think this is pretty good proof that I've figure it out.

©2014, copyright Emily Kowalski Schroeder
]]>
<![CDATA[Census Sunday: Street Name Changes and Enumerator Errors]]>Sun, 16 Mar 2014 02:14:43 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/1/post/2014/03/census-sunday-street-name-changes-and-enumerator-errors.html In 1940, my great-grandparents, Louis and Adele Licciardi, lived with their two adult daughters, Dina and Yola, on the east side of Cleveland, Ohio. (Click on image for larger view.) On this form, their surname looks as if it is spelled 'Silccirdi,' which is probably just a mistake of the enumertor (not the only one, either, as we will see.)
Picture
The Licciardi Family, 1940 U.S. Census
My great-grandfather's occupation is listed as 'Sewing' and 'Men's Clothing'.  He owned and operated a business known as 'Paris Art Embroidery' in downtown Cleveland, and here it is listed in the business section of the 1940 Cleveland City Directory:
Picture
1940 Cleveland, Ohio City Directory, Business Section
My grandmother, Dina, who is listed as 'Diana' on the census form, and her younger sister, Yola, are working as a 'Saleslady' and 'Cashier', respectively.  In the residential section of the 1940 Cleveland Directory, we actually see that they are working at The May Company, which was one of the major department stores in the city at the time. (Dina is listed as 'Dine' and Yola is listed as 'Viola.'
Picture
1940 Cleveland, Ohio City Directory, Residential Section
The census form lists their address as 3521 East Blvd, and the city directory lists it as 3591 East Blvd.  I searched for both addresses on Google Maps and Google Street View and came up with nothing; there are not even any addresses on the current extent of East Blvd that are close to the 3500s.  My initial thought was that this part of the street had changed names between 1940 and the present day.  To solve this mystery, I decided to consult the 1940 census enumeration district (ED) maps, which, fortunately, are found online.

In my humble opinion, the easiest way to get to the right map is to use this search link at stevemorse.org.  You simply select the state, county, and city in which you are interested and you will get a list of links to the available 1940 enumeration maps:
Picture
How do you know which map is the area you are interested in, especially if you are searching a larger city?  Go back to your census form and find the city Ward number, which is in the upper part of the sheet.  In this case, we are interested in Ward 28.  I had to search each map individually until I found the big number 28.  Once I did, I went back to this link (large-city street finder) on stevemorse.org, chose the correct state, city, and ED number, and the page will then list all of the streets covered by THAT enumeration district. (The ED number is in the upper-right corner of the census form - in this case, it is 92-683.) This process is essentially a way of finding my great-grandparents' most immediate neighborhood, which I outlined in the red box below (click on image for larger view.)
Picture
1940 ED Map, Cleveland, Ohio
Picture
Stevemorse.org; Results of Large-City Street Finder
Indeed, if you look closely on the old ED map, there is East Blvd, right between Glenboro and Clarebird.  I searched for 'Glenboro Dr, Cleveland, Ohio' on Google Maps, and here is what I got:
Oh look, that street between Clarebird and Glenboro is no longer called East Blvd, but instead has been renamed Martin Luther King Jr. Drive.  (By the way, there is still a road known as East Blvd in this part of Cleveland, which simply added to my confusion.)

Turns out, the census enumerator wrote the wrong house number for the Licciardi family's address on the 1940 form.  He wrote '3521,' which, if you look carefully, doesn't even fit the sequence of the other addresses on the page. And, upon further searching, I discovered that there isn't even a lot at 3521 MLK Jr. Blvd. Thank goodness for the city directory, which DID have the family's correct address (3591).  

I HAVE located the home via Google Street View and will be talking about it in a separate post later this week, so stay tuned!

©2014, copyright Emily Kowalski Schroeder
]]>
<![CDATA[Tuesday's Tip: Local Library Periodicals]]>Tue, 11 Mar 2014 00:20:56 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/1/post/2014/03/tuesdays-tip-local-library-periodicals.htmlPicture
All family historians know the value of libraries and their vital roles in genealogy research.  Local history books, church book transcriptions, microfilms, tax records, probate records, maps, subscriptions to online databases - all of which can be found at local libraries and all of which are useful in discovering who are ancestors were. But how many of us regularly use our local library's periodical holdings in our genealogy education and research?  

I am usually at our local town library at least once a week for children's programs, but, honestly, I rarely have the chance to browse the shelves for myself.   My daughter and I walked past the magazine stands the other day and there I saw Family Tree Magazine.  A light bulb went off in my head - why didn't I ever think to look here in the magazine section for titles that may help me with my genealogy research?


I also noticed that there were several general history titles among the racks: WWII History, Civil War Times Illustrated, and American History.  And, as I look through the online catalog, I see that even our smaller town library holds several local and state-specific periodicals that could be very useful to Indiana family historians: Indiana Magazine of History,  Traces of Indiana and Midwestern History, and Hoosier Genealogist. (Unfortunately, nearly all of my U.S. genealogy research consists of Ohio ancestors, so these titles probably wouldn't be that useful to me personally.)  

So, it's all right to rush to the probate record books, microfilms, and online databases when you are doing genealogy research at the big city/states libraries, but don't forget that some great resources might just be found in your local library's periodical department.  And of course, the best part is they are FREE!

©2014, copyright Emily Kowalski Schroeder

]]>
<![CDATA[Tombstone Tuesday: George and Rosalie Voisinet]]>Tue, 04 Mar 2014 01:57:54 GMThttp://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/1/post/2014/03/tombstone-tuesday-george-and-rosalie-voisinet.html This past Sunday, I wrote a blog post about the family of George and Rosalie (Jardot) Voisinet, French immigrants who were my husband's 5x great-grandparents.  George and Rosalie immigrated to America in 1852 from Evette, France and settled in Loramie Twp, Shelby County, Ohio.  They are buried in St. Remy Cemetery in Russia, Ohio.  A nice, detailed history of the St. Remy Parish can be found at this link.  
Picture
Source: FindAGrave.com, photographed by Jenni Monnier
George and Rosalie passed away in 1866 and 1875, respectively, so this is obviously not their original gravestone.  It's nice to see that there are descendants out there who are willing to contribute to the maintenance (and replacement) of their gravestone.

©2014, copyright Emily Kowalski Schroeder
]]>